Thursday, March 27, 2008

Adobe Photoshop Goes ... Mainframe?

There's a word you don't here much anymore. Mainframe. It dates back to the time when all computing was done on a centralized machine and you fed information into it via either punch cards or "dumb terminals."

The 1980s saw the explosion of the desktop computer and, since then, every 18 months computing power has doubled for the same cost. (A variation on Moore's Law.) Heck, your cell phone probably has more memory and computing power than my first computer (which was, for the record, a Commodore 128 with the 300 baud modem, 80 character monitor and an external 5.25 inch disk drive).

Now, we do all of our processing on our own machines - everything from word processing and spread sheets to video and photo editing. Will we continue to?

That's a big question. Google Docs has moved two of those activities online. (Haven't played with it? If you're in any sort of organization that does collaborative works, it's a great tool. And free.) We now store photos online, too.

And, now, Adobe has introduced Photoshop Express - an online version of Photoshop. You upload your photos to their server, send a series of editing commands and it pushes the edited image back to your screen.

Which is kind of like, oh, I don't know ... a mainframe computer?

1 comment:

Tom O'Connor said...

Thought you might enjoy this article about why old technologies are still around, it features the newest mainframe from IBM.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/23/technology/23digi.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

I think distributed computing will become more and more common, but it still has a long way to go. Google Docs and Google Spreadsheet still has a long way to go compared to MS Office.

-Tom